Keynote Speakers

Dr. Joseph Kielman

Affiliation:
Science and Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Keynote Speech Title:
Visual Analytics for Emergency Response
Bio:
Joseph Kielman is Science Advisor in the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Dr. Kielman is assigned to the Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency, where he manages research programs in cyber security as well as visual and data analytics. In addition, he established and continues to manage the Center of Excellence for Visual and Data Analytics for the S&T Office of University Programs. Dr. Kielman has directed the National Visualization and Analytics Center program, housed at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, since its inception. He also oversees joint programs on visual and data analytics, anomaly detection, and critical infrastructure protection with the National Science Foundation, the United Kingdom Home Office, and the German BMBF. Prior to joining DHS in 2003, Dr. Kielman worked for 20 years at the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), where he was successively Chief of the Advanced Technology Group in the Engineering Section, Chief of Research and Development for the Technical Services Division, and Chief Scientist and also Chief Architect at the Information Resources Division. His work at the FBI included development of advanced information collection and surveillance systems, microelectronic and micromechanical design capabilities, advanced computer architectures, and information processing and analysis technologies. Dr. Kielman has an undergraduate degree in physics and graduate degrees in biophysics and did postdoctoral work in genetics. In 2006 he was awarded the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Senior Professional.

Barry Costa

Affiliation:
The MITRE Corporation
Keynote Speech Title:
Human Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Dynamics and Modeling
Bio:
Barry Costa joined The MITRE Corporation in 1984 and has led critical, fast paced projects for the USSOCOM, Air Force, USCENTCOM, USLANTCOM, the Joint Staff, DTRA, ASD RE, and others. He has had a broadly diverse career in pioneering digital imaging technologies and immersive visualization systems; human social culture behavior analysis and modeling; operationally focused human domain analyses; tagging, tracking, and locating; and physics based modeling. Mr. Costa is both the Director of MITRE's Technology Transfer Office and the systems engineer for the OSD DDR&E Human Social Culture Behavior (HSCB) modeling program. As Director of MITRE's TTO he makes internally developed technologies available to commercial companies that then make them accessible to the government and the public as affordable products.
He has worked closely with ASD RE in the development and execution of the Human Social Culture Behavior Modeling Program and has guided US government research in the area for the past several years. His responsibilities include providing technical leadership and oversight to a broad range of human domain situational awareness research and operationally focused programs in the DoD and IC to ensure that these areas are focused and relevant to the operational needs of the US government.

Dr. William J. Burns

Affiliation:
Decision Science Research Institute Inc.; National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events, USC; California State University San Marcos
Keynote Speech Title:
Public Response to Disasters: Current Approaches to Exploring Perceived Risk, Economic Impacts and the Mitigating Role of Risk Communication
Abstract:
Public Response to Disasters: Current Approaches to Exploring Perceived Risk, Economic Impacts, and the Mitigating Role of Risk Communication. We have witnessed disasters over the last two decades on a scale of human suffering and societal costs that is very sobering. The magnitude and complexity of these events have served to alert scientists and public officials alike to the challenges that lay ahead in the management of risk. Individuals, communities, nations and even entire regions of the world are vulnerable to catastrophic events. This vulnerability arises not only because of the scale and unpredictability of these events, but also because of the complex manner in which people and institutions respond to risk. An adverse event, be it a natural disaster, technological accident, or terrorist act, interacts with psychological, social, institutional, and cultural processes in ways that may amplify (or attenuate) public response to the event. Studies of disasters have typically presented a largely descriptive and static portrayal of peoples' perceptions of risk, affect, and trust in government for aid and protection. More recently, researchers have begun to explore how risk perception changes over time in response to a number of factors. They have also begun to examine the dynamic mechanisms behind these changes. This has led to advances in our understanding of the ripple effects resulting from different hazardous events and the potential for these effects to be very costly. This talk will outline what is currently known about public response to disasters. It will also discuss the joint role of experimentation, longitudinal surveys, and simulation in the study of public response and disaster impacts. Recommendations for mitigation will be presented.
Bio:
Bill Burns completed his Ph.D. at the University of Oregon in Decision Science. He is currently a research scientist both at Decision Research (Eugene, OR) and is associated with the National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE at USC) where he coordinates the risk perception and risk communication group. He is also on the faculty at California State University San Marcos where he teaches statistics and decision modeling. His work has been funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Science Foundation. Research and interviews related to the public's response to the different crises have appeared in academic journals such as Management Science and media such as The Wall Street Journal, The Huffington Post and National Public Radio. Most recently, he was the guest editor for a special issue in Risk Analysis entitled "Risk Perception and Behaviors: Anticipating and Responding to Crises". Investigations over the near future seek to develop a new generation of research focused on a dynamic rather than a static portrayal of risk perception, risk-related behavior, and policy preference.

Dr. Pietro Michelucci

Affiliation:
Strategic Analysis, Inc.
Keynote Speech Title:
Human Computation in Security and Intelligence Applications
Abstract:
What is human computation and why is relevant to intelligence and security applications? On one end of the human computation continuum, we train machines to behave like humans by using humans as teachers, either via direct supervision or using human-derived data. At the other end of the continuum, we augment human capabilities with machine-based resources or enhancements, so they can do their existing jobs better. Between these two poles, there is a vast and fertile middle ground left for exploration. What does this space of potential research look like and what are the possible affordances in the security and intelligence domains? This talk seeks to raise these question and inspire new related ideas and research.
Bio:
An Indiana University trained cognitive scientist and mathematical psychologist, Pietro Michelucci has been supporting DARPA research as a science advisor since 2006. There he developed DARPA's first human computation initiative, a 2009 SBIR project called "Massively Distributed Problem Solving" toward developing "a problem-solving system that combines an automated optimizing infrastructure with myriad distributed human processing agents". More recently, he completed a DARPA seedling study to assess the affordances of shared sensing, collective reasoning, and coordinated action on group efficacy in a real-time augmented reality environment. Prior to consulting at DARPA, Dr. Michelucci was CTO at a small health informatics company, during which time he pursued independent research, including projects to develop a universal meta language for data interoperability in the social sciences, a Threat Detection Analysis framework based on modeling the Intelligence Community as a multimodal perceptual system, and advancing new methods for prognostic analysis using DNA microarray data. Dr. Michelucci is currently developing a new Handbook of Human Computation for Springer New York with over 85 committed authors, and is founding a first-ever journal on the same topic. He continues to advocate for the advancement of Human Computation as an interdisciplinary science and provides ongoing support as a scientific and technical advisor for various Artificial Intelligence initiatives at DARPA.